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Mansfield University... Developing Tomorrow's Leaders School Library & Information Technologies



Courses


Course Schedule   |   Recommended Course Path

LSC 5501 Instructional Collaboration
LSC 5505 Children’s and Young Adult Literature
LSC 5511 School Library Technologies
LSC 5516 Collection and Information Access
LSC 5521 Introduction to Cataloging & Classification in the School Library
LSC 5522 Advanced Electronic Cataloging
LSC 5526 Managing the School Library
LSC 5531 School Library Advocacy and Leadership
LSC 5535 Information Literacy & Academic Standards
LSC 5541 Information Fluency for the Digital Landscape
LSC 5546 Current School Library Issues: Legal and Ethical Perspectives
LSC 5565 School Library Practicum
LSC 5566Professional e_Portfolio (Letter of Completion-only)
LSC 6600 Leveraging School Libraries to Improve Student Learning


LSC 5501 - Instructional Collaboration

Skills necessary to implement a collaborative and integrated library information curriculum will be developed. Students will recognize the role of the librarian as a leader in curriculum planning and professional development. They will identify resources and instructional tools necessary to support the instructional program.

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LSC 5505 - Children’s and Young Adult Literature

Children's & Young Adult Literature is a three-credit course that all candidates must complete in order to receive a M.Ed in School Library and Information Technologies (SL&IT). Students will investigate the development of children's and young adult literature as genres. Special attention to increasing the breadth and depth of experience with fiction, nonfiction, and poetry award winning titles forms the central focus of the course as students evaluate, compare, and research many books and authors. Selection tools will be used to locate works for curriculum support, for multicultural collections, and for multiple characteristics of readers. Picture book studies and a study of alternate formats will be carried out in the context of current practices in reading instruction and resource provision. Book talks and principles of recommending books for teacher and student needs will be practiced. Students will also undertake a major curriculum support project emphasizing children's and young adult literature.

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LSC 5511 - School Library Technologies

This course presents an overview of typical network and Internet protocols with an emphasis on understanding the associated electronic delivery of instructional resources and services. The course will cover the basics of networking including wireless technologies, and basic web technologies. Assistive technologies for students with disabilities, consideration of classroom and physical space issues as they relate to technology, and the systematic renewal / planning for technology will also be covered. Technological aspects of the use of mobile devices and social media as they are associated to the school library will also be considered. A primary objective for this class is to develop an understanding of the concepts and terminology of computing networks to assist in working with technology coordinators and school administrators in the use and acquisition of computer related resources and the ability to envision (if not implement) ways of using various technologies for the 21st century learner.

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LSC 5516 - Collection and Information Access

LSC 5516 Collection and Information Access will prepare students with the knowledge, skills, and resources to develop a 21st century school library collection that integrates traditional print resources with digital content to meet the diverse curricular and professional needs of students and teachers. Ownership versus access will be a reoccurring concept as various types and formats of resources are studied, including books and periodicals, licensed electronic databases and ebooks, and freely accessed websites and teaching tools.  A collection development process involving assessment, selection, weeding, acquisitions/budgeting, and evaluation will be applied.  New instructional technologies, including portable devices, required to access ebooks and other web-based resources will be discussed.tions decisions, and promoting the use of the resources. Students will also review and use various selection tools and learn the parts and importance of a written collection development policy.

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LSC 5521 - Introduction to Electronic Cataloging

This course is designed for new school librarians who wish to provide their patrons with the most successful access to their school library collections. Participants of the course are intended to be brand new to the field of school librarianship or practicing librarians who have little to no experience with electronic cataloging and classification systems. Students will develop skills to apply the principles of description (cataloging) and organization (classification) of print and media resources. The application of RDA, the MARC21 format, Sears List and Library of Congress subject headings, and the Dewey Decimal Classification system will be emphasized. Students will also become familiar with integrated library systems, the evolving OPAC, and the consideration of various cataloging services relevant to the school library environment.

Note: this course may be replaced by LSC 5522, Advanced Electronic Cataloging (see below).

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LSC 5522 - Advanced Electronic Cataloging

This course is designed for graduate students with prior electronic cataloging knowledge and experience who want to increase access to their school library collections. Course participants will advance skills to apply the principles of description (cataloging) and organization (classification) of print, media, and digital resources. The application of AACR2 and RDA, Curriculum-Enhanced MARC, Authority Control, Subject Access points, and the Dewey Decimal Classification system will be emphasized. Students will also develop local standards for cataloging specifications, apply database clean-up and maintenance tasks in their school library's catalog, and explore the decision making process for migration of integrated library systems.

Prerequisites (courses which MUST be completed prior to taking this course): completion of an undergraduate/graduate cataloging course and/or at least 3 years of experience in working with electronic cataloging in a school library.

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LSC 5526 - Managing the School Library

LSC 5526 Managing the School Library focuses on the administration of a school library program which supports all stakeholders in teaching and learning. Candidates use strategic planning principles, program assessment tools, and reporting of various kinds to insure that the school library program fulfills the school's mission. Best practices studies of facilities, staffing and budget issues emphasizes enhancing the library program as well as minimizing financial impact. Candidates develop a policy and procedures manual including all of these management and program elements and services, offering a firm foundation for running a school library that leads in information literacy and technology applications as part of a 21st century school.

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LSC 5531 - School Library Advocacy and Leadership

LSC 5531 School Library Advocacy and Leadership develops skills in school library candidates to effectively influence key stakeholders and decision makers to support quality school library programs and staffing. Candidates will learn to leverage research, survey data, student achievement scores, and evidence-based program assessments to communicate the role of the school library and librarian as an essential component of K-12 education to school administrators, parents, legislators, community leaders, and others. Additionally, research and effective communication skills will be practiced in locating external funding sources, writing a grant, and developing an action research project to improve school library services and resources. Candidates will develop a three-year advocacy plan that includes active participation in professional learning networks and library associations and reflect on their leadership actions.

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LSC 5535 - Information Literacy & Academic Standards

At the heart of learning and student achievement is information literacy, the ability to efficiently locate, evaluate and use information. This course focuses on preparing prospective school librarians to understand many important aspects of providing quality, student centered, information literacy instruction. This will be accomplished by examining the underlying structure of state and national, information literacy and academic standards. Creating literature appreciation experiences, studying recent school reform, developing curriculum and skills lessons, understanding statewide assessment, and planning staff development programs will enable students to function as the information professional in the school.

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LSC5541 - Information Fluency for the Digital Landscape

Information Fluency for Digital Landscape course emphasizes participation in professional learning networks, creation and maintenance of a learning portfolio, production of instructional digital stories, screencasts, and posters, creation of resources and instruction in the form of a collaborative Research LibGuide and a reflective, process-conscious, culminating research investigation. School library candidates will have the opportunities to identify, evaluate, and thoughtfully integrate current and emerging information and communication technologies to promote inquiry and learning and develop research skills in the K12 environment.

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LSC 5546 - Current School Library Issues: Legal and Ethical Perspectives

School library candidates will explore current issues facing school librarians through legal and ethical prisms while weighing changes in professional practice. Participants will explore five major issue areas: copyright; 2) minors’ privacy in a school library; 3) intellectual freedom including the First Amendment, filtering, self-censorship, and challenges to library and classroom resources; 4) access to library resources and services for students with special needs; and 5) advocacy for minors’ intellectual freedom. For each issue, participants will examine the legal requirements under the First Amendment, federal, and/or state laws; consider the gray-area dilemmas faced daily; seek guidance from the ALA Code of Ethics and other core professional statements; and determine best practice in an ever-changing environment. With an emphasis on discussion and blogging with experts, and use of other social media tools, school library candidates will engage in real-life practical exercises and creative projects.

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LSC 5565 - School Library Practicum

Degree Only and Degree + PA Certification Candidates

The School Library Practicum (SLP) course is a variable one or three-credit course that all candidates must complete in order to receive a M.Ed in School Library and Information Technologies (SL&IT). The one- credit course is for candidates who are certified school librarians and who have worked as a school librarian for at least one year prior to taking the LSC 5565 course or for candidates who are not required by their state department of education to complete an internship in a school library for school library licensure, endorsement, or certification. The three-credit course will be required for all other candidates. LSC 5565 is the culminating course for the SL&IT program in which candidates must complete the following requirements:

 Candidates who are registered for the one-credit course will complete an electronic portfolio that will include a philosophy/mission/vision for a school library, curriculum vita, and artifacts that demonstrate the candidates' competencies as defined by ALA/AASL Standards for Initial Preparation of School Librarians. Candidates will upload their electronic portfolio to a publically accessible web server. In order to qualify for the one-credit course, candidates will submit a one page document that is signed by a building administrator stating that they have worked as a school librarian for at least one year prior to taking LSC 5565 School Library Practicum. In addition, the candidates will submit a copy of their state's library science certification document to the instructor.

Candidates, outside of PA, who are not required by their home state to complete an internship/practicum for school library certification, endorsement or licensure, may qualify for the one-credit course. These candidates will need to submit a written document from their state department of education that states that the internship/practicum hours in a school library is not required.

Candidates who are registered for the three-credit course will complete the same portfolio as required for the one-credit course that will include a philosophy/mission/vision for a SLM, artifacts that demonstrate the candidates' competencies as defined by ALA/AASL Standards for Initial Preparation of School Librarians, curriculum vita, instructional lesson(s) documentation, promotional materials related to an author/illustrator unit, Practicum log, mentor evaluation, etc. Candidates will upload their electronic portfolio to a publically accessible web server. In addition, the candidates will complete 100 hours of field service and various assignments in a school library under the supervision of a mentor who is a certified school librarian and the Mansfield University instructor.

Prerequisites: 21 credits completed in the SL&IT program and must include LSC 5501 (Instructional Collaboration) and LSC 5531 (School Library Advocacy and Leadership).

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LSC 5566 Professional e-Portfolio

The basic requirement for this course is designing and publishing an electronic portfolio. Candidates in this course will develop an electronic professional portfolio using a web based product. In addition to writing a purpose and use for the portfolio, each candidate will create comprehensive curriculum vitae and cover letter. Candidates will learn about the interview and hiring process and participate in virtual interviews. Candidates will self-reflect, select and publish a variety of artifacts that demonstrate knowledge related to technologies for digital literacy. The portfolio will document professional development, competencies, and accomplishments.

 

LSC 6600 - Leveraging School Libraries to Improve Student Learning

LSC 6600 is a short, one-credit graduate course for principals, curriculum and technology coordinators and other school administrators available online, usually in July. It is designed to build leadership and advocacy skills in how to maximize a school library program to increase student achievement. School leaders learn the research correlating school libraries with improved test scores, how to integrate information literacy skills with classroom curriculum and state academic standards, how to improve access to libraries and collections, and are provided with some basic guideline and evaluation tools. Click the Show Details button below for the syllabus, or view the course Homepage.

Note: this course is not a regular SL&IT course for the degree and is offered primarily to principals and other K-12 administrators. The course is offered infrequently, depending on grant funds.

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